• TrustingZebra
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    16711 months ago

    Final paragraph sums it best:

    Don’t want any bloatware or subscription services preinstalled on your computer? Consider installing Linux instead of Windows the next time you’re reinstalling your computer.

    • Bleeping Lobster
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      5111 months ago

      I’m quite interested in using Linux, but it won’t run many, if any of the 100s of plugins I own, let alone my audio interface, or my production software.

      At least, that’s my assumption. I did a search and can see there’s a decent DAW for Linux (the amusingly-named Cockos Reaper), it’s affordable at $80. But I’d also need to buy a new audio interface, there’s a few that have Linux drivers. An expensive experiment. My interest is because it’d be amazing to have a stable system to play music live, with no weird Microsoft shit happening in the background guaranteed.

      • Boozilla
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        1911 months ago

        Reaper is awesome. It’s pro tools for non-millionaires.

        • @[email protected]
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          11 months ago

          Reaper is awesome indeed. But the DAW isn’t the issue, it’s the VST, very few work on Linux

        • @[email protected]
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          411 months ago

          Reaper is the best there is for Linux. There are other alternatives of you want FOSS, but they are not as good.

          • umami_wasabi
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            111 months ago

            Not a pro DAW user. I use it to just substitute Adobe Audition to some extend. Tenacity is used most of the time.

        • Bleeping Lobster
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          211 months ago

          Ardour is very appealing to me because it supports VST3! There is a ‘wrapper’ available to make VST3 compatible with Linux, but that’s just adding the complexity and potentially bugginess that I’d be trying to escape from.

          • @[email protected]
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            11 months ago

            FYI I am using reaper on Linux and I have all my windows plug-ins working through yabridge (32 and 64 bit vst/vst3), focusrite interfaces don’t even need special drivers, that and my alesis midi keyboard just worked when I plugged them in. I just started using Linux semi-permanently at home last week for the first time (though I am a developer)

      • @[email protected]
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        11 months ago

        Does the interface that you have now work under Linux? Linux has pretty good support for a lot of things now, so you may be able to use what you have. Reaper also has a generous free trial, so potentially this is a free experiment. (I’m no expert and just tinker with this stuff, but I have Reaper and I find it similarly easy/difficult as every other DAW I’ve used) Several distributions have “live images” where you can run it from a flash drive without copying anything to the hard drive. I don’t know if you could set up Reaper and your interface from a live image.

        If you do decide to do an installation, consider buying a different hard drive and installing Linux on that. You can install both Windows and Linux on the same drive, and it’s not difficult, but it is slightly easier to use a separate drive and they are not expensive.

        I have used Linux and Windows a lot, but I have only used Reaper in Windows, so unfortunately I can’t say whether it’s a similar experience.

        • Bleeping Lobster
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          311 months ago

          Unfortunately, not only is my interface not supported, but it straight up doesn’t work with linux (according to all the forum posts I’ve seen of people trying, failing, then asking UAD why no Linux compatibility). It’s a UAD Apollo USB, ASIO-only.

          I’ve got a frankly ludicrious number of M2 / SATA drives in my music PC so installing on a separate drive is no problem. Thanks for the tip! I bought a new interface for mobile production / live work, so maybe I’ll fare better with that than the UAD beast. Certainly wouldn’t want to stop using that because it’s an absolutely fantastic interface, not to mention the 2x SHARC chips which allow me to run CPU-intensive UAD hardware recreations without smashing my CPU.

      • @[email protected]
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        311 months ago

        If you want to try Linux, try Ubuntu or mint. Those are the easiest to make an entry into.

        • Bleeping Lobster
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          911 months ago

          The ‘proprietary software’ you’re referring to is Cubase, which is one of the industry standard DAWs. I think I’m OK relying on the DAW / company that created the VST protocol and is used by pros all over the world.

            • Coolishguy
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              611 months ago

              With some industry software, the proprietary stuff really is better. There are plenty of great FOSS tools out there, but not always the exact thing you need. For example, PDF software: I don’t know of any editor as powerful as Acrobat. And I absolutely hate Acrobat, but it’s the best tool out there for modifying a PDF.

                • @[email protected]
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                  211 months ago

                  Bud you don’t control any of the software on your device I’d bet. FOSS or not. Even if you’re building from source, are you inspecting every line of code on every update? Are you reviewing every PR that gets merged? No, of course not.

      • @[email protected]
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        1911 months ago

        Guess it depends on the industry. I’m a web developer so it doesn’t matter what OS I use, and frankly it’s far easier to install and configure the tools I need on Linux than it is on Windows. I can leave a Linux system online for weeks at a time, which in some cases is the entire length of a contract.

        Windows is good, but it requires just as much training as any other system to become a real power user.

        • @[email protected]
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          011 months ago

          I disagree. If you consider a power user using PowerShell or terminal, then sure. But simple things on windows are more complex on Linux. Like installing a program, if you can do it through snap or apt get then great, still more complex for the average user compared to windows where you just download and click.

          • @[email protected]
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            111 months ago

            Literally it’s just download and click.

            From the Store if it’s there, or from the application website.

            • @[email protected]
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              -111 months ago

              No it’s not, if it’s not on the store (outside of Ubuntu does a store even exist?) then it’s more difficult to install. Half the time it’s an appimage you have to download, make it executable and then run. Then if you install it from a website you have to go through the trouble of adding a shortcut into your application menu / desktop and it’s just way more complex than Windows.

              • @[email protected]
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                111 months ago

                The repositories for the big distros are so full that you rarely need to ever install anything that isn’t already there for you. I use a crapload of software, and I have literally one thing that I’ve installed that I downloaded from the internet. All updates are handled by the package manager, so there aren’t dozens of services running to check for updates. Installing software on linux was already so much easier, byt Flatpak and SNAP have made it absurdity simple.

                On windows, you literally go to some website download an executable, and run it. Every time I need to do it for work, I’m shocked that it’s such a messy and insecure setup.

      • @[email protected]
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        1011 months ago

        For most things, Linux just works. There are specialized apps like cad packages, graphic design and such that are very problematic on Linux but most of it is fine. Just look at how successful Chromebooks are. They’re all Linux.

      • @[email protected]
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        811 months ago

        That’s funny, that’s the reason I ditched Windows completely. The workflow is just so bad on it.

      • @[email protected]
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        711 months ago

        Sure, and once you’ve clicked through the “finish setting up windows” pop up that inexplicably appears every few reboots, done the mandatory updates it keeps nagging you about and threatening to reboot if you happen to walk away for too long, and cleared out all the ads in your notifications, you can get right to it!

    • @[email protected]
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      -411 months ago

      Most of us actually have software to run, not endlessly tinkering with a failed desktop OS

      • @[email protected]
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        711 months ago

        Lemmy has a strong bias towards Linux. I wouldn’t say Linux is a failed desktop OS (but hey look at the marketshare) but the transition to Linux is not easy for majority of less tech savvy users. I know you guys have setup Debian/Ubuntu for your grandma and it has been working great since, you don’t have to repeat that.

        As someone who’s been trying to move over to Linux for years and fallback to Windows every time I tried, there’s always issues I need to troubleshoot, the most recent one would be mixed refresh rate monitors ie. running at 60Hz instead of 144Hz until I made specific change to a config file. And as a gamer, it makes it even harder - I am aware Proton is a thing now and ‘most’ games work out of the box, I have Steam Deck for my portable needs. Pay attention to the keyword ‘most’, when it doesn’t work, I ain’t wanna spend my previous time to troubleshoot so that I can play the game.

        As for my Windows 11 experience, it hasn’t been that bad. There’s no more active prompts for update and restart your computer now or the world will end. UI also looks better with minimal tweaks. Is privacy concern something I should care more? Absolutely, but at this stage of my life, I value more on the consistency and expected behaviour from my PC.

        Server use case on the other hand, Linux > all.

      • @[email protected]
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        311 months ago

        a failed desktop OS

        Windows still has over 60% of desktop market share. You may not like it, but it isn’t a failed OS.

      • @[email protected]
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        211 months ago

        I was with you on the software compatibility point, but then you completely lost me with “failed desktop OS”…

      • @[email protected]
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        2011 months ago

        Well yeah, because we don’t have the marketing billions and monopoly that Microsoft/Apple enjoy. So we gotta do the promoting ourselves.

          • imecth
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            1211 months ago

            Linux has hundreds of distributions, plenty of which feature gui alternatives like Linux Mint, everything’s not arch. I’ll remind you console commands are a thing on windows as well.

          • @[email protected]
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            1111 months ago

            Lol, tell me you don’t know anything about Linux without telling me you don’t know anything about Linux.

      • @[email protected]
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        411 months ago

        I was just thinking about this recently, there’s a lot of talk about HDR and nit brightness specs and such recently, but I must be the only one that finds current panels too eye-searingly bright. My current IPS monitor is set at 2% brightness and it’s just comfortable enough for daily use. Even my OLED TVs don’t have brightness set over 10%.

        • @[email protected]
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          11 months ago

          I mean yeah I have the same issue too (escept I use around 20-25% brightness on my OLED). But HDR is about more than just brightness. For me it’s worth it for the extra colors—especially teal—which SDR displays struggle the most at reproducing accurately.

          • @[email protected]
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            111 months ago

            Interesting observation on the colours! To be honest I never got past the brightness when I turned it on. I couldn’t get past a couple of minutes before feeling like my eyes were being burned by the hellfires of Satan’s asshole.

            Granted it might be the IPS panel (aw3821dw), so I would have to upgrade to an ultra wide 220ppi OLED to test out this HDR that everyone’s raving about when it becomes available … for science. RIP my wallet.

      • Bakkoda
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        211 months ago

        I was honestly a little disappointed in how HDR looked. Maybe I didn’t calibrate or set my colors properly. Dunno.

        • @[email protected]
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          211 months ago

          What kind of panel technology? You really need an OLED to get a decent HDR image. My old VA TV looked so washed out in HDR, so I never used it.

  • igorlogius
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    5411 months ago

    Microsoft has already earned enough money from your license purchase, and the software giant shouldn’t need to include any first- or third-party bloatware.

    Microsoft:

    • @[email protected]
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      11 months ago

      Uhhhh I don’t know about y’all but I got one Windows license for free back in college, and I’ve upgraded that one ever since to newer versions of 8, 10, and 11 for free. Oh yeah, and I actually scammed a second license out of that one, I just held on to my old Win7 drive for a few years, then booted it up in a new system one day and associated it with a different MS account, and upgraded it all the way to 10. The upgrade process gave me a second Windows key apparently, so I got two licenses for zero dollars.

      And that’s not even mentioning the $5 OEM licenses that you can get online… Also, you know you don’t NEED a Windows license, right? You can leave Windows deactivated indefinitely, the only downside is that “please activate Windows” shame text on your desktop (which you can get rid of with a registry edit).

      • @[email protected]
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        411 months ago

        Why do any of that shit when you can walk into your local library/community college and grab the key off of that for free? And it wont suddenly shit out on you one day like those 5 dollar “OEM” OS keys.

        • @[email protected]
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          311 months ago

          You think stealing from your local library is somehow better or more reliable than an OEM key? LOL

          • @[email protected]
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            11 months ago

            You think those 5 dollar “OEM” keys are legit? They are not. Plus, its a blanket license. The only one to count those is to get a physical machine count. If its a crime its victimless because they don’t lose any access, microsoft just loses a buck and I dont give a fuck about a megacorp and their OS money

            • @[email protected]
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              111 months ago

              I didn’t say they were legit. You seem to think that stealing keys from your local library is, though? Lmao

              • @[email protected]
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                111 months ago

                Its more legit than those 4 dollar cards on ebay. The key itself is anyway. I’m not really sure what your beef is when this harms no one.

        • @[email protected]
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          211 months ago

          Usually you have to pay $500+ for a course in a course that would justify giving you access. They don’t just hand them out to anyone who walks in the door without paying.

          • @[email protected]
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            11 months ago

            Have you tried it? Its a community college not a university. Most aren’t IDing people as they walk into the door. The public library also does not require classes to use.

              • @[email protected]
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                111 months ago

                I guess that makes 2 cases of anecdotal evidence. I’ve never had my library ask questions though. To this day I’m still rocking a community college’s OS key on my Windows machine.

      • @[email protected]
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        211 months ago

        Years ago I worked for a company that provided employees with an MSDN subscription. When I left I went in and activated all the product keys and put them in a spreadsheet. No one in my family has had to buy Windows in a long time

    • @FluffgarOP
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      1411 months ago

      Aye. But make them work for it, eh? XD