• @[email protected]
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    362 days ago

    I know this is an older article, but EAC has had compatibility with Linux for years at this point. Linux is also really easy to compile and develop for compared to MacOS. They just don’t want to because there aren’t enough players to justify the cost, most likely. Also might have some incentive to keep their game off the hardware of their biggest competitor.

    • @abraxas
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      212 days ago

      Actually, I think they don’t want linux gamers, with their higher technical savvy. Some game dev companies love how 90% of their bug reports come from 10% of their users (and even brag about it). Other companies would rather just not get those 90% of bug reports.

      • Echo Dot
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        319 hours ago

        It’s probably a good thing because your average Joe Public can’t write the bug report to save their life.

        You get titles like “It’s broken and not working”. If you are very lucky you’ll also get a screenshot where everything looks absolutely fine and with absolutely no context as to what the problem supposedly is. The reason technical savvy people can write good bug reports is because they disproportionately work in IT and see terrible support tickets everyday, and know what not to do.

        For example, if you’re reporting that outlook will not load it’s possibly a good idea to give a phone number and not an email address for contact purposes. Just a thought.

      • @[email protected]
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        32 days ago

        i remember playing fortnite in its prime, bugs where never fixed, they stayed there for years. Cosmetics on the other hand where added daily …

        • @[email protected]
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          118 hours ago

          That’s a valid development strategy. It seems to have worked out for them. I suppose it kind of makes sense as long as nothing is breaking.

          I don’t even know if it’s still a popular game as it’s a bit hectic for me. But it’s had a good run.

      • @[email protected]
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        22 days ago

        I think most Linux gamers understand they’re not going to get official Linux support. And most of the cases it’s also not necessary because the compatibility layer is pretty good. The only big hurdle is anticheat and that’s where epic would have to do the bare minimum of adding their own native EAC client to Fortnite.

        Now the argument that it would increase cheating in a hugely popular game like Fortnite is somewhat legitimate, but I think it’s more likely Sweeney would rather let leopards eat his face than support anything related to Valve.

        • @[email protected]
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          120 hours ago

          Also if the typical Linux user is like me they’re never spending a cent on a free game. Which invalidates their whole business model.

        • @[email protected]
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          12 days ago

          I think the argument of increased cheating has some merit, but less so in hugely popular games like fortnite. Because no anticheat is actually perfect and people who want to cheat will just use whatever method works. In a popular game like fortnite the demand is high enough that someone will find a way to cheat regardless of Linux support

    • @[email protected]
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      382 days ago

      Yeah, Timmy’s had a hate-boner for anything related to Valve and Linux for years. He’s been lying through his teeth non-stop whenever either topic comes up.

  • MentalEdge
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    3 days ago

    This from the man who thinks he’s “competing” with Valve?

    Valve is figuring out how to run games they didn’t even develop on Linux, while Epic complains it’s too hard to do for even their own games…

    That’s rich.

      • MentalEdge
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        No it isn’t, I didn’t claim it was, and Valve is doing a good bit more than mere pre-configuration.

        Valve is contributing efforts to improve Wine, DXVK, VK3D, shader-cache management, and making their use simple and easy.

        If I figure out how to use Bottles, then in a literary sense it is completely correct to say: I figured out how to run windows software on Linux.

        The sentence doesn’t suddenly become false if I didn’t write every line of code, from kernel to compatibility layer, that my PC is executing to do it.

        • @[email protected]
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          82 days ago

          DXVK is sooo good now I install it for half my games on my Windows machine just for the performance gains

          • @[email protected]
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            122 hours ago

            I’ve been doing the same thing, if the performance of a game feels like it could be better I slap that shit in there and it often drops GPU usage by at least half, it’s frankly ridiculous.

      • @[email protected]
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        352 days ago

        Valve invested time and money in Wine and DXVK. Claiming Valve is not trying to figure out how to run games on Linux because they’re contributing to a project instead of creating a new one from the ground up, then only Linus contributes to the kernel?

      • @[email protected]
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        172 days ago

        Sometimes you need a few developers getting paid full time to truly get a project like DXVK off the ground. Some of the biggest open source projects wouldn’t even exist without the time and money from companies that actively support it.

  • @[email protected]
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    1793 days ago

    A terrifically hard audience to serve given the variety of incompatible configurations.

    If your game doesn’t work with my fully functional operating system (while others do), isn’t it literally your game that’s “incompatible?”

    • @[email protected]
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      1153 days ago

      Plus He’s talking about the steam deck here. That’s 1 configuration. And Rocket League is already on steam for those who bought it before epic did, runs fine in proton. The dude is full of shit and making up excuses, it’s obvious this is a business agreement and nothing to do with practicality and in lying about it he’s hurting his reputation.

    • @[email protected]
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      423 days ago

      Plus it isn’t like there aren’t tons of compatibility issues with all the versions of hardware on PC.

    • @[email protected]
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      223 days ago

      My kids, unfortunately, love the game, so I’ve kept up with performance a little bit. It seems they’re trying their best to make it run like trash. They can’t even support the few operating systems it does run on. I haven’t noticed any mind blowing graphics updates, but fps is around a third of what it used go be. Such a garbage company.

      • atocci
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        3 days ago

        The cartoonish artstyle might hide it a bit, but Fortnite is basically Epic’s showcase of all the newest Unreal Engine tech. The move to UE5 a couple years ago brought with it all those new features and a huge leap in graphics. Fortnite has been around for a long time now, so the minimum performance targets are probably changing as tech and average system hardware improve. I don’t actually play it, but it’s pretty much a different game now compared to when BR mode was first released.

  • @[email protected]
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    182 days ago

    Okay, now give me another free game Epic. I’ve got over 100 probably on you wacko store and have not paid for a single one.

    • @[email protected]
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      120 hours ago

      I’ve got like 400.

      Think I only paid for Outer Wilds plus the DLC, and Untitled Goose Game out of all those, because everybody should play Outer Wilds.

    • @[email protected]
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      142 days ago

      You say that like you’re getting one over on them. But they’ve successfully got you to download their shitty software. You think they aren’t aware of what they’re doing?

      • Miss Brainfarts
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        120 hours ago

        This is where the Heroic Games Launcher comes in, it only downloads the game itself, no Epic Games Launcher to be seen

      • @ricecake
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        31 day ago

        They know what they’re trying to do, which is to bait people into spending money on their platform so they can have revenue numbers to show developers to get them to release on their platform to get people to want to spend money with them without bait.

        Taking the bait but not getting caught in the trap isn’t quite pulling one over on them, but it’s also not what they were hoping for, so it’s not not taking advantage.

          • @[email protected]
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            42 days ago

            Not the other guy but I download them through heroic, install a crack, repack, store on my NAS. That is, if the game is one I’d like to keep for the future.

            So yeah some of us are absolutely taking those free games AS free games without downloading their software. A couple of mine have been “loaned” to friends and family, even.

          • @[email protected]
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            2 days ago

            Correct. Fuck Epic. They’re awful.

            Full transparency though, I’ve played precisely one game on epic games store, Alan Wake 2 because I like Remedy as a developer and want to support them. Alan Wake 2 will never come out on any other platform and I’m not buying a console to play one game.

            • @[email protected]
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              22 days ago

              Okay but redeeming the games doesn’t actually do anything. Epic doesn’t care. You’re not messing with them by just having an account if you don’t use it

                • @[email protected]
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                  -12 days ago

                  Oh no, not the metrics!

                  I’m sure they’re fully aware that some percentage of people will redeem the games with no intent of actually playing them.

                  The whole point is to generate word of mouth for their store. You’re out here doing their job for them, talking about how many free games you’ve gotten from them.

  • @nanoUFOOPM
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    1083 days ago

    This is why I don’t give Epic and any exclusives on it’s store any money. I know 0% of it is going back into making linux gaming better.

    • @gravitas_deficiency
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      353 days ago

      I will happily take advantage of their free giveaways, though.

        • @kboy101222
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          I don’t give a rats ass about their market share, epics never going to pass steam, but they still have to pay devs to give away those games, and with a lot of the games being indie titles, I’m perfectly happy for some free money to go into a devs pocket

          To add on to this: steam was dog shit before epic came along. A lot of people are either unaware or have forgotten how bad steam actually was until it got some real competition

            • @kboy101222
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              12 days ago

              Man, I hadn’t heard that rant in years.

              And yeah, I remember a lot of people both cheering and hating on EGS when it was first announced. A lot of people were saying it would be as bad as uplay and whatever ea calls their launcher now (it wasn’t), or that devs would get screwed by the platform (they didn’t).

              I also remember a lot of people saying it would be a “steam killer”. It wasn’t, but even without direct evidence I feel comfortable saying it was a major factor in steam finally making their launcher halfway decent. It still has a ways to go and I still think EGS does some things better (why TF would I ever want to launch directly to the store, valve? Just show me my fucking games)

          • @Kecessa
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            02 days ago

            And if you only care about playing your games then Epic’s launcher has the shortcut right in your face when it starts while Steam has it in a separate page with a popup in the way.

            People can praise Steam all they want, for new it’s just bloated as fuck.

  • @[email protected]
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    712 days ago

    “We don’t have enough developers to support Linux!”

    • Tim Sweeney promptly fires 700 developers
      • @Eezyville
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        152 days ago

        Maybe there should be a feature that warns us if the article is more then 6 months old. Our maybe a bot could do it.

        • Scrubbles
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          102 days ago

          Lemmy just added the ability to add on server plugins. That would be a prime case for a server plugin

      • @[email protected]
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        52 days ago

        Rage bait has already been here for a long time.

        I feel like the reddit exodus just brought over all of the angry users.

    • @fruitycoder
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      102 days ago

      Good catch I was just wondering he doubling down all of a sudden.

    • @nanoUFOOPM
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      42 days ago

      I noticed too late, I forgot the steam deck is old now.

  • kratoz29
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    382 days ago

    Some would say not having Fortnite on Linux is a feature…

  • Scott
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    703 days ago

    He can go fuck himself with a 6" railroad spike.

    At least Gaben is pushing the Linux gaming community forward!

    • @[email protected]
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      2 days ago

      BUT 30%!!!

      Yeah, that 30% means I can ditch Windows. At least it’s being used for good and not just* yachts.

        • @[email protected]
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          23 days ago

          …what? Yeah, 30% is the standard when there are higher costs and higher risks. Why would it not follow that Steam using the same percentage - with lower costs and none of the physical-based risk - is simply greed?

          • @vulgarcynic
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            253 days ago

            If you look at the overall cost of running a platform though, especially one that does several things, you can see where that 30% becomes viable.

            A few things to highlight are, long-term storage and availability of purchases. There is not a single game I have bought on Steam in close to 20 years that I can’t still download and play to this day. Many of those are games that are no longer available for sale on the storefront yet valve as a content provider keeps them available to me and likely will in perpetuity.

            There’s an argument to be made that storage is cheap but they are also storing other people’s things that are no longer generating revenue for them. Also, they are providing the bandwidth for us as users to download those games whenever and as many times as we like without concern for how many copies of title sold or who the initial publisher or developer was.

            When you look at something like a console provider such as Nintendo or Microsoft who will completely shut down legacy stores, it makes the value of valve taking a unilateral 30% all the more attractive. Anything I buy on Steam I will be able to download and play in perpetuity. That 30% goes to making sure this isn’t just for big-name or the current hot shit. This is for everything ever put on their platform.

            Sure, in a vacuum 30% seems like a lot but when you consider the overall maintenance costs and the fact that they have seemed to be pretty pro-consumer all along, The intrinsic value in what they’re offering becomes a lot easier to see.

            • @vulgarcynic
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              I also wanted to add on a recent experience I had that highlights this even more so.

              I was going through old archive drives and found a digital copy of “The Club” that I had purchased from Direct2Drive. I don’t know if anybody remembers them or not but, they were one of the early digital storefronts that focused on PC digital downloads.

              Anyways, I had the installer and my provided key in the directory so I installed the game and attempted to launch it only to be met with an activation screen. When I attempted to activate those servers had long since been decommissioned so I was dead in the water. Feeling that sting that one gets when they can no longer play something they legally purchased I started searching around for information on workarounds before I grabbed a crack. I found a thread from the company that had purchased the rights to all direct2drive purchases that had a workaround for doing the authentication through an alternate method.

              I tried all the steps listed including performing a recovery process for an account that I had long since lost the login information for only to be met with a failed authentication once again. By this point I had invested close to an hour maybe an hour and a half of my time trying to get some shitty old game to work and decided it wasn’t worth it.

              I hopped over to Steam and saw that I was able to purchase the game directly from them for $5 and download it immediately without any need for additional authentication steps or trying to track down who had purchased the rights to give me access rights to the thing that I had purchased 15 years ago.

              Sure, my one experience may be anecdotal but I think it highlights some of the greater issues people might not take into consideration when talking about what valve’s cut is and what that represents to us as the users of the services they provide.

              • @Kecessa
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                -52 days ago

                If their revenues were close to their running costs Gaben wouldn’t own multiple yachts, stop defending a company that made a billionaire out of its owner while you’re making less a year than he burns in a day on his boat.

                • @vulgarcynic
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                  123 hours ago

                  I don’t begrudge him running a successful business. And I didn’t give a shit about who you feel I can or cannot defend. Lol.

            • @[email protected]
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              02 days ago

              Two issues, you can download and play your games in ‘perpetuity’ so long as Valve continues on the current operating model.

              And Valve has not been particularly consumer friendly in the past.

              They were found to be violating consumer rights in Australia at the very least and had to put a large notification on their storefront to disclose exactly what they had been wrong.

              Valve were forced into providing a refund model and even then it often conflicts with consumer interest. Though admittedly bad actors will always try to abuse any refund model on digital products.

          • @[email protected]
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            143 days ago

            Why would it not follow that Steam using the same percentage - with lower costs and none of the physical-based risk - is simply greed?

            Most of the retailers mentioned in that article were also digital only and had the exact same or less risk. Steam certainly does a lot to try and get people’s money, but they aren’t just greedily fucking over Devs for that 30%, that is in fact industry standard.

            I also have no doubt that Epic will enshitify itself and raise its rate closer to 30% after growing.

          • @[email protected]
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            3 days ago

            Its not one to one, but providing digital services is not exactly cheap. Data centers and servers take a lot of costs, both the electricity and salary for a team of ops engineers to keep it running smoothly. The building, conditioning, maintenance, insurance, storage, equipment. To ensure low lag and high download speeds you need several data centers with data caches in different regions of the world. If anything it is actually more risky. If a store closes the stock was already paid for by the the owner to the publisher. Zero risk for the publisher. If Steam goes down, it brings windows of opportunity for sales with it and not a dime is secured. They pay for the uptime and quality of service, not just processing a payment once and a download link with a shitty 72 h expiry time. People expect access to their digital goods 24/7 virtually forever. Steam provides it all with a myriad more of business and client facing services that a physical store would simply be incapable of providing.

          • Fubarberry
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            73 days ago

            It’s still the market standard for digital stores, and if steam was greedy they could absolutely charge more with their market dominance.

            For comparison audible has audiobook market dominance, and takes a 75% cut. If you agree to make your audiobook audible exclusive, they’ll “only” take 60% of the profit, and many audiobook authors take that deal because getting an extra 15% cut on audible is worth more than the sales from other audiobook stores.

            Audible is what you get when a greedy corporation has market dominance, in comparison Steam’s cuts are very tame for all the benefits they give.

            • @Kecessa
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              -12 days ago

              Or maybe they were as greedy as they could be without risking another company coming and taking their place, they also protected themselves against that by including a clause that prevents selling games cheaper on other stores so even if someone comes and tries to compete the devs are stuck because they need to choose if losing access to Steam’s monopoly is worth it to be able to sell their game cheaper to end up with the same amount per copy in their pockets.

              • Fubarberry
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                22 days ago

                they also protected themselves against that by including a clause that prevents selling games cheaper on other stores

                Is that even a real thing? Other stores sell games cheaper all the time. Even when buying steam games it’s usually cheapest to buy the steam key from another store, because someone else will have it on sale for cheaper.

                • @Kecessa
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                  -12 days ago

                  It’s part of their contract, Wolfire Games is suing them for anti competitive practices.

        • @Kecessa
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          There’s the weakest defense of a capitalistic business practice you could come up with…

          “It’s the industry’s standard!”

          Ok, if the standard was 50% and someone came along and said “Know what? We can do the same thing for 20%” would you be defending those charging 50%? What if it was 75%?

          The reality is, they’re taking 30% because their position allows them to do so and people don’t care enough about those actually doing the work to create games to push Valve to change their ways. Valve is as greedy as any other company.

          Remember folks, Gaben is a billionaire that owns multiple yachts, he’s not your friend, he’s making a fuck load of money instead of making sure you get the most from your money, Valve could lower their cut by a whole lot while still being extremely profitable.

        • @[email protected]
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          -32 days ago

          30% is the standard. And it’s absurd. They all do it because they all have their own walled garden territory, and it doesn’t benefit any of them to lower prices.

          You’re telling me that Steam does 30% of the effort to create and publish a game?

          • @[email protected]
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            52 days ago

            They distribute games, which is something in addition to creating and publishing.

            Whatever percentage they use is based on an average across wildly different games. A large game with frequent updates doesn’t need to pay steam for the work on steam’s end each update. They don’t need to pay for each tine someone downloads their game, or for the ongoing costs to upgrade steam over time to continue supporting their game. They have a set percentage per sale so they can easily calculate how many units they need to sell to break even.

            If the game’s sales die off they don’t need to pay for steam to continue support. At any time they can use the popularity of a new release to renew interest in past releases without any extra requires work. When game sequels blow up, the publisher doesn’t need to do anything to get sales money from new sales of the prior versions. The prior games are just there, waiting to make the publisher money.

            How much value do you think any distribution platform provides?

        • @[email protected]
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          -13 days ago

          Just because there’s an outdated industry standard doesn’t mean it should be perpetuated, let alone supported, for eternity. Valve’s server hosting costs on a per-installation basis have fallen substantially since they first launched Steam, so there’s no reason why the 30% cut is still necessary; even 20% would leave them a sizable profit margin. I’m not a fan of the Epic Game Store for bribing companies to not release their games on Steam for a set amount of time, and choose not to use it as a result, but it’s time that the 30% industry standard be dropped. In purchasing a game I want to support continued development of that franchise, and $15 of a $50 purchase going to the storefront is not only excessive and inflationary, but harms developers as well.

          • @[email protected]
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            03 days ago

            I guess you wouldm’t be complaining if they never improved efficiencies then, since decreasing costs should apparently be passed on to distributers. Shame on them for improving their business sonthey could use those profits to create the steam deck and other benefits for gamers instead of propping up the profits of game companies!

            Should game companies lower their proces based on volume of sales when they make ‘enough’ profit?

            • @[email protected]
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              3 days ago

              Valve could still operate as it currently does, including having sufficient profits to account for R&D and long-term costs, at a lower cut of platform sales (as another commenter mentioned, Gabe Newell’s billion dollar yacht collection is demonstrative of the platform’s profitability, especially when one considers how much it costs to maintain ships). Products such as the Steam Deck make money for Valve too, as Steam Deck users (myself included) statistically buy more games on Steam as a result. I don’t support profiteering efforts by game publishers either, such as the Factorio price increase attributed to inflation, $70 game releases attributed to inflation when digital releases have reduced their costs, and micro transactions in general. In any case, however, given that cost increases are always the consumer’s responsibility, cost decreases should not simply be a means for companies to bolster their profit margins.

              • @[email protected]
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                12 days ago

                I am fine with someone who set up and runs a successful business that is in no way predatory and is a benefit to employees, consumers, and the companies that use their product to have an excess amount of money. They are doing capitalism the right way and actually earned the benefits.

                Games going up to $70 are not becsuse of the 30% cut. They wouldn’t go down if that percentage dropped either. I play multiple games that were always sold at $40 or less as full games and they have been massively profitable.

                • @Kecessa
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                  -12 days ago

                  So it’s not predatory to let games become more expensive while also reducing running costs? Because if you run the numbers it means they’re just increasing their profits by charging the same % and forcing devs and publishers to increase the cost of games to compensate for development costs increasing. The only winner here is Valve, maybe you should start defending your own interests instead of defending the interests of a billionaire.

            • @Kecessa
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              -12 days ago

              You’re the one that ends up paying for it though, games could be cheaper, instead Valve just increases its profits.

        • @[email protected]
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          Yeah, I meant to throw a “not just yachts” in there but my brain don’t work right. We all have our passions. At least the guy looks out for the industry through the eyes of a consumer and doesn’t behave like a pissbaby.

          • @Kecessa
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            -12 days ago

            Only if we ignore that a lot of Valve’s pro consumers practices are things that were legally imposed and that their 30% cut is driving up costs for consumers and that they actually use anti competitive tactics to prevent other platforms from actually competing.

        • @[email protected]
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          33 days ago

          that money is absolutely being put towards buying yachts

          Did anybody claim that Valve’s entire earnings go into Linux gaming? Of course it’s only a tiny fraction but that tiny fraction is more than anybody else put into Linux gaming.

          Also, Gabe Newell also owns an Aston Martin sportscar team called Heart of Racing, so it’s not just yachts. They’ll compete in Le Mans next weekend in case anybody cares.

          • atocci
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            13 days ago

            I’m not sure I follow. The comment I was replying to said Valve’s 30% cut isn’t being put towards buying yachts, but it is. Apparently racing teams too. Whether they’re doing good things for linux gaming or not, Gabe is still a billionaire and he sure spends the money like one.

        • @Kecessa
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          12 days ago

          A bunch of them, he’s just another billionaire but people can’t help defending him.