• Smuuthbrane
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    2692 months ago

    Anarchist answer: They’re both unisex - bees for pees, birds for turds.

  • Smuuthbrane
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    1852 months ago

    Bees have a stinger, and “bird” has been a slang term for a woman (like, what, 1920-1950s?).

    Regards, I agree that’s needlessly vague, and just about to the point of useless.

    • SjmarfOP
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      562 months ago

      Birds have peckers

      • Smuuthbrane
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        122 months ago

        Wow, how did I miss that??

    • @[email protected]
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      222 months ago

      Wtf

      Alternate comment: I love how you need to internalize 100 years of sexism before you can relieve yourself

      • Smuuthbrane
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        182 months ago

        You’re using logic in a situation where someone has to pee badly.

    • Ekky
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      102 months ago

      Thank you for the explanation.

      As someone not too familiar with American cultures, I’d probably make an assumption and go for the (to me) more masculine bird over the docile and flower loving bee, since bees have stingers that they normally would never use and birds have beaks/peckers.

        • Ekky
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          22 months ago

          Hmm, well, I have heard women being compared to singing birds (or more degrading as vultures or pen of hens if in group), but I’ve more often heard women being romantically compared to bees or flowers. Though, I don’t think I’ve ever heard men being compared to bees, but often to birds (eagles, vultures, seagulls, etc.).

          Might also be local culture, as I usually think of harmony, nature, and perhaps matriarchy when pondering bees, while birds seem much more gender neutral, like, standoff-ish, elegant, brutal, impulsive, egoistic, even presented as predatory and evil in children movies and some media.

          So, using common stereotyping, you can see where I’m coming from.

        • Smuuthbrane
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          12 months ago

          Maybe that’s where I heard it? Dunno, it’s certainly not current by any stretch.

    • Bob
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      42 months ago

      Odd that so many people are coming out the woodwork to say they didn’t know Britons fairly often call women birds.

      • @[email protected]
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        42 months ago

        I’ve heard dame used more often than bird myself. Honestly, not sure I’ve actually heard bird used… it’s like a vague sense of “I think I knew that… right?” and my brain shrugs back.

        • @VirtualOdour
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          22 months ago

          It’s slang you’d hear 50 years ago in the east end and Essex. You’ll only really hear it used by gangsters in movies these days or someone putting on the accent for laughs, possibly from an old geezer, you certainly won’t hear it used by respectable establishments or family friendly media. It’s not generally considered offensive but is considered uncouth.

  • @[email protected]
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    1212 months ago

    Find a member of staff and ask where the “human bathrooms” are. Don’t let them leave until they explain. Bonus points if you piss your pants while they are trying to explain.

    • Flying SquidM
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      2 months ago

      “Excuse me sir/madam, I am looking for the human bathroom as I need to pour out some liquid from inside of my body through my urethra, something we humans normally do.”